"In his dual roles as Wolf and Horst, David Gow was a revelation. In total command of his instrument, this is an actor’s actor. Limitations of space prevent me from detailing his performance, but I must say that his final scene, desperately attempting to win himself a few moments more of life, was as harrowing and heartbreaking as it was unforgettable. Remember his name.”

-Thaddeus Motyka, Qonstage

"He is astonishing. For an actor to memorize this would be so so difficult, but he does it, david gow. it's a showcase for him. it is very well done."

-Peter Filichia, Broadway Radio

"David Gow in Tommy Flowers shared with audiences the sort of bold, risk-taking artistry that makes you remember what you love about being a New york playgoer. 

-Mark Dundas Wood, "Best Theater of 2017" (StageBuddy)


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"David Gow, as the innocent Devon is captivating to watch. His journey from a man fighting for his life to an empowered human being is alarmingly alluring. Gow adds a lot of depth and layers to his role which shows what a fine actor he is."

-Nicholas Linnehan, Theater that Matters


"David Gow’s performance is moving to say the least. He went on an emotional journey unlike any other and reached those emotional peaks bringing the audience along with him."

-Kaila M. Stokes, Theater in the Now


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"Meanwhile, there is Devon (David Gow), who changes before our eyes from a blubbering mess and a symbolic representation of casually complicit white America into a complex character for whom life in general makes little sense."

-Howard Miller, Talkin’ Broadway


"Gow does not so much embody the role as devour it. Gow pulls back from the bombast and hubris that often colored individuals from the counter-culture and instead fills his Tommy with vulnerability and despair." 

-Anthony Pennino, The Modernist Beat


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"DAVID GOW (DEVON) AS THE YOUNG WHITE MAN PLAYS HIS DIFFICULT PART WITH CARE AND RESPECT, FROM HIS FEAR OF DEATH TO HIS UNAWARE PRIVILEGE, TO AN UNEXPECTED TURN."

-MR Anderon, Theater Pizazz


Gow is great fun to watch. It’s a flashy and challenging role, and the actor explores effectively all the nooks and crannies of Tommy’s jumbled psyche. Gow shows us the part of Tommy that revels in mischief and mayhem.” 

-Mark Dundas Wood, Stage Buddy


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“WHAT CLARITY THERE WAS CAME FROM THE BRILLIANT CAST - PARTICULARLY PROPS TO THE VETERAN WITH A HEAD-INJURY (DAVID GOW), WHO DISGUISED SOME RIDICULOUSLY HEAVY-HANDED CHARACTERIZATION UNTIL THE VERY LAST MOMENT.”

-Rachel Aroesti, Three Weeks Edinburgh


Gow stars as the cute and cunning free-wheeling malcontent,bringing a mixture of youthful charisma, immature delinquency, and tragic doggedness to his role. We can’t help but be amused by him (his over-the-top imagining of himself as James Dean, a young handicapped girl confronting the First Lady, and Marilyn Monroe are hilarious).

-Deb Miller, DC Metro Theater Arts 

 

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"… a thrilling David Gow as Pericles, allows the audience to catch subtle acting choices."

-Jackson Cooper, CVNC

Gow is an appealing, very talented young man who gives an admirable performance”

-Darryl Reilly, Theater Scene

"THE SHOW (SCOOTER THOMAS MAKES IT TO THE TOP OF THE WORLD) SUCCEEDS BRILLIANTLY. DYLAN ARNOLD AND DAVID GOW GIVE INCREDIBLE PERFORMANCES NAVIGATING THEIR CHARACTERS THROUGH DOZENS OF VIGNETTES." 

-Glenn Morrissey, Hollywood Fringe



"I was particularly impressed with the performance of David Gow (the quiet boy without a name neglected to the point of having never seen the sun, who emerges into Peter Pan, a fearless and selfless leader)." 

-Dr Tom Stevens

"DAVID GOW IS TERRIFIC AS PETER THE ORPHAN WHO, WITH A LITTLE NURTURING FROM MOLLY (PLAYED BY THE WONDERFUL EMMA GEER) COMES OUT OF HIS SHELL AND SAVES THE DAY.

-Heidi Sutton, TBS News Media

"AT THE STEADY HEART OF THE STORY, GOW’S PERFORMANCE RANGES NICELY FROM WRONGED SUITOR TO LOVE-STRUCK “KNIGHT” TO SUFFERING, NEAR-MAD WANDERER. THOSE TRANSITIONS MAKE THE BEAUTIFULLY PLAYED FINAL SCENES EVEN MORE EFFECTIVE." 

-Bill Cissna, Journal Now